News

#IAMSE23 Registration is NOW OPEN

We are pleased to announce that registration for the 27th Annual Meeting of IAMSE, to be held June 10 – 13, 2023 in Cancun, Mexico is now open. At this annual meeting of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) faculty, staff, and students from around the world who are interested in health science education join together in faculty development and networking opportunities. Sessions on curriculum development, assessment, and simulation are among the common topics available at the meeting.

Featured plenary speakers include Professor Kara Caruthers (Meharry Medical College, USA), Dr. Michelle Daniel (University of California San Diego School of Medicine, USA), Dr. Anique de Bruin (Maastricht University, The Netherlands), and Dr. Ricardo Leon-Borquez (World Federation for Medical Education).

Additional meeting details and registration can be found at www.iamseconference.org.

#IAMSECafe Archives

IAMSE Cafe Virtual Sessions

4/9/2024 Effect of Curricular Reform on Faculty with Kathryn Huggett and Gary Smith
3/26/2024 IAMSE 2024 Conference Promo with Rakhi Negi and Kim Dahlman
3/5/2024 It isn‚Äôt ‚Äúself-directed‚ÄĚ anymore if you have to direct it, or is it? with Jonathan Wisco
2/20/2024 Impact of Research on Undergraduate Medical Education with Tameka Clemons
2/6/2024 Do I need a mentor or a coach? Exploring faculty development resources to support professional growth with Kathryn Huggett
1/30/2024¬†Annual Goal Setting and Accountability Check-In Session with Rakhi Negi and Chasity O’Malley
1/16/2024 Winter Solstice Book Club with Chasity O’Malley
12/19/2023 End of Year Celebration with all Cafe hosts
12/5/2023 Clerkship Readiness After Step 1 P/F with John Folk
11/21/2023 Lessons Learned During the IAMSE Virtual Forum with Ian Murray
11/7/2023 A Futurist’s Perspective on Medical Education with Denise Kay
10/17/2023 Early Career Award with Rakhi Negi¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† 10/03/2023 Professionalism with Chasity O’Malley¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† 9/19/23 Accreditation Standards Around DEI with Rakhi Negi
9/5/23 Foundational Sciences vs. Basic Science Factoids with Wendy Lackey Cornelison and Neil Osheroff
8/15/23 How to Distinguish Students After Step 1 P/F with Dr. Dave Harris (chat description)
8/1/23 Tips for Getting Students to Buy in to Active Learning with Tameka Clemons
6/20/23 I23 Recap with Wendy Lackey Cornelison and Amber Heck
5/16/23¬† Overcommitement with Chasity O’Malley¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† 5/2/23 ¬†KNN with Dr. Dave Harris, Sarah Williams, Joelle Worm¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† 4/18/23 Imposter Syndrome with Wendy Lackey Cornelison¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†3/21/23 IAMSE 2023 Annual Conference Preview with Amber Heck¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† 3/7/23 Curriculum Refresh with Jon Wisco¬†¬†
2/21/23 What Does Research Mean to Undergraduate Medical Education? with Rakhi Negi
2/7/23 What are You Reading This Winter? with Katie Huggett
1/17/2023 Foundational Competencies with Lisa Howley and Eric Holmboe
*If you would like to give feedback on this initiative please fill out the form here or email CBME@aamc.org
12/20/2022 End-of-Year Celebrations with Jon Wisco
11/15/2022 Best Practices for Preparing a Successful Grant Proposal for the IAMSE Educational Scholarship and Curriculum Innovation Grants with Amanda Chase, Amber Heck, and Algevis Wrench
11/1/2022 Should I Stay or Should I Go? When Your Next Career Move is Somewhere Else with Katie Huggett
10/18/2022 The Aquifer Sciences Curriculum Database: A Collaborative Development between the IAMSE community and Aquifer with David Harris and Dr. Tracy Fulton
10/4/2022 Sharable Open Education Resources (OER) With ScholarRx with David Harris
9/20/2022 Mitigating Implicit Bias in Medical School Curricula with Jacqueline Powell and Jayne Reuben
9/6/2022 Early Career Award Winner with Jaya Yoda
8/16/22 Toolkits for Medical Science Educators: A Resource for Professional Development and an Opportunity for Scholarship with Nicole Deming, Amber Heck and Jon Wisco
8/2/22 Moving Up in MedEd with Christina DeLucia and Diana Lautenberger
7/19/22 Summer Reading with Chasity O’Malley – Chat Log
6/21/22 IAMSE 2022 Meeting Recap with Kelly Quesnelle
5/3/22 Mentoring in Health Professions Education with Alice Fornari and Darshana Shah
4/19/22 How to Make the Most of Conference Attendance with Heather Christensen
4/5/22 #IAMSE22 Annual Meeting Preview with Maria Sheakley
3/15/22 Third Party Resources with Kelly Quesnelle
3/1/22 Assessment Styles with Jon Wisco
2/15/22 What is the Optimal Timing of Course Evals? with Jon Wisco
2/1/22 Maintaining Professionalism Through Fatigue with Wendy Lackey
1/18/22 Practical Tips for Connecting With Students with Jon Wisco
1/4/22 The Changing Landscape of MedEd with Adi Haramati, Giulia Bonaminio, Frazier Stevenson, Amy Wilson-Delfosse, and Neil Osheroff
12/7/21 IAMSE New Member Meet and Greet with Kelly Quesnelle
11/16/21 Technology in Health Sciences Education During COVID-19: Gains, Losses, and Transformations with Poh Sun Goh and Sol Roberts-Lieb
11/2/21 IAMSE Fellowship and ESME at IAMSE with Adi Haramti, Amber Heck and Amanda Chase
10/19/21 IAMSE Ambassador Program: Global perspectives on medical and science education with Claudio Cortes and Joseph Grannum
10/5/21 Teaching and Incorporating the Health Humanities with Alice Fornari2/2/21 To teach, or not to teach (to the test), that is the question with Jon Wisco
9/21/21 Open Forum to Discuss Basic Science in the Clinical Years with Kelly Quesnelle
9/7/21 Meaningful, Sustainable Transdisciplinary Collaboration: What would it look like? with Atsusi Hirumi
8/17/21 Opportunities for Health Sciences Education in One Health with Margaret McNulty and Rebecca Lufler
8/3/21 Evaluations of Our Teaching with Wendy Lackey
7/20/21 Incorporating Telehealth Into Basic Science Education with Jon Wisco
7/6/21 Virtual Simulations with Jon Wisco
6/1/21 The State of Medical Educators in Developing Nations with Sylvia Olivares and Smart Mbagwu
5/18/21 Building bridges between health science educators from diverse programs with Jennifer Lamberts, Jayne Reuben, and Jonathan Wisco
5/4/21 Outreach Programs with Kelly Quesnelle
4/20/21 The New Horizon of (Medical) Education with Cafe Hosts
4/6/21 IAMSE 2021 Annual Conference Preview with Mark Hernandez
3/16/21 Career impacts of the COVID Year with Lisa Coplitt
3/2/21 Conducting and Disseminating Medical Education Scholarship
2/16/21 The paradigm shift implications on courses and curricula as a result of moving to pass/fail USMLE Step 1 with Doug Gould
1/19/21 The Basic Sciences and the Medical Humanities: An Integrative Approach with Hedy Wald. Suggested reading and faculty development opportunities discussed during the call.
1/5/21 Best Practices for Mentoring with an Eye and Ear Toward Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice with Heather Christensen
12/15/20 Unconventional Teaching Methods with Jon Wisco
12/1/20 Resiliency with the IAMSE Cafe hosts
11/17/20 Learning During and From a Crisis: The Student-Led Development of an online COVID-19 Curriculum with Abby Schiff and Katie Shaffer
Links from the conversation during this session can be found below.
11/3/20 Teaching Race and Medicine: Unlearning what we think we know with Staci Leisman
Links from the conversation during this session can be found here.
10/20/20 The future of education programs for residents and medical students with Lourdes Lopez
10/6/20 Technology and Education with Edgar Herrera Bastida
9/15/20 Team-Based Learning in the Virtual Environment with Drs. Raihan Jumat, Irene Lee and Peiyan Wong
9/1/20 Networking 102 ‚Äď Networking Outside the Box with Kelly Quesnelle
8/27/20 Mentoring to Make a Difference with Katie Huggett – Literature references can be found here.
8/13/20 IAMSE Ambassadors ‚Äď Pakistan, Australia, and Finland with Di Eley and Yawar Hyatt Khan
7/23/20 The Disappearing Pathology Instructor with Amy Lin and Regina Kreisle
7/9/20 Partnering with medical students to discover educational solutions for on-line learning with Emily Bird
6/25/20 The Future of Medical Education Conferences: What SHOULD it look like? with Bonny Dickinson
6/11/20 Communities of Practice in a Virtual World with James Pickering
5/28/2020 IAMSE Ambassadors ‚Äď Mexico, China, Caribbean with Raul Barroso, Sateesh Arja and Zhimin Jia
5/21/2020 Faculty Development in the COVID-19 Era with Alice Fornari
5/14/2020 Evolving Anatomical Education during the COVID pandemic: What will this mean for the future of anatomy teaching? with Jon Wisco, Richard Gonzalez and Lane Fortney
5/7/2020 COVID-19 and the New Medical School with Amber Heck and Michael Lee
4/30/2020 MedEd Equity During COVID-19 with Heather Christensen
4/23/2020 IAMSECafe Welcomes Medical Science Educator EIC with Peter de Jong
4/16/2020 Q&A with the IAMSE President with Neil Osheroff
4/14/2020 MedEd Mailbag: Free Resources During COVID-19 with Kelly Quesnelle. Resources discussed and shared during this session can be found below.
4/9/2020 How Re-thinking and Re-designing Anatomy Instruction Into the Online Space Can Lead to Better Classroom and Cadaver Lab Learning Experiences with Jon Wisco
4/7/2020 MedEd Mailbag: Being Productive in Your Own Space with Kelly Quesnelle
4/2/2020 Leading by Example: Practicing Self-care in a Time of Crisis with Adi Haramati
3/31/2020 MedEd Mailbag: The Virtual Teacher with Kelly Quesnelle

 

Resources for Educators During COVID-19

Harvard Medical School Medical Student COVID-19 Curriculum
One of the greatest difficulties facing everyone nowadays is a lack of clarity about what is going on and what lies ahead. We students especially feel a need to deepen our knowledge of the situation, as we are often viewed as resources by our friends and family. However, it soon became clear how challenging it was to process the wealth of information coming our way. A team of us at Harvard Medical School set out to quickly collate and synthesize accurate information about the pandemic to share with those who do not have the time or resources to research it themselves.
Additional resources include Curriculum for Kids, an article written by the team discussing the curriculum, and an opportunity to give direct feedback to the developers.

AAMC COVID-19 Resource Hub
The AAMC continues to monitor guidance from federal, state, and local health agencies as it relates to the coronavirus (COVID-19). Find information and updates from AAMC on this emerging global health concern.

Acland Anatomy
Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy contains nearly 330 videos of real human anatomic specimens in their natural colors.

MedEd Portal Virtual Resources
This collection features peer-reviewed teaching resources that can be used for distance learning, including self-directed modules and learning activities that could be converted to virtual interactions. As always, the resources are free to download and free for adaptation to local settings. The collection will be reviewed and updated regularly.

BlueLink Anatomy
From the University of Michigan Medical School

Aquifer
Aquifer is offering free access to 146 Aquifer signature cases, WISE-MD (Surgery), and WISE-OnCall (Readiness for Practice) through June 30, 2020, to all current Aquifer institutional subscribers in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Kaplan iHuman
With i-Human Patients, students experience safe, repeatable, fully-graded clinical patient encounters on their devices anywhere, anytime.

Online MedEd
The unprecedented COVID‚Äź19 crisis has upended the medical and medical education landscape. Our aim during this difficult and confusing time is to support you with what we do best‚ÄĒconcise, high‚Äďyield videos to help you get up to speed efficiently and effectively‚ÄĒso you can feel confident with however you’re being called on to adjust.

ScholarRX Bricks
In response to a request for assistance from a partner medical school impacted by COVID-19, ScholarRx has agreed to make its Rx Bricks program available at no cost to M2 students for the remainder of the 2019-20 academic year. This comprehensive, online resource can assist schools in implementing contingency plans necessitated by the COVID-19 outbreak.

Osmosis
You can raise the line by training healthcare workers who don’t have experience treating COVID-19. Encourage healthcare workers you know to complete this free CME course on COVID-19 so they’re prepared to fight the virus.

AnatomyZone
Top-quality anatomy videos, all for free.

Harvard Macy
Crowdsourced List of Online Teaching Resources Collated by the Harvard Macy Institute (@HarvardMacy)

Anatomy Connected

Chronicle of Higher Education

Dartmouth SOM Interactive Rad/Anatomy

Firecracker
We understand some of the unique challenges you are facing due to the COVID-19 pandemic and, as a company, are putting together resources to help you keep up with your courses as well as stay up to date with the latest research and evidence-based practices for addressing this new coronavirus.

LWW Health Library

Bates’ Visual Guide

5 Minute Consult
Primary health care is important to everyone, and now more than ever it’s important that you have access to evidence-based diagnostic and treatment content. To help you with caring for all of your patients, we are offering 30-day free access to 5MinuteConsult.com. Use code 5MC30DayAccess73173 to sign up.

Say Hello to Our Featured Member 2019 Annual Meeting Site Host Rick Vari

Our association is a robust and diverse set of educators, researchers, medical professionals, volunteers and academics that come from all walks of life and from around the globe. Each month we choose a member to highlight their academic and professional career and see how they are making the best of their membership in IAMSE. This month’s Featured Member is our 2019 annual meeting site host, IAMSE President Rick Vari.



Rick Vari, PhD
Professor & Senior Dean for Academic Affairs
Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
Roanoke, Virginia, USA

Why was the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine the right choice for the 2019 IAMSE meeting?
We are the right choice for the meeting this year because we did a fabulous conference several years ago and we were already in the queue for a future IAMSE meeting. We had some scheduling issues with our original site for 2019 and we were able to step in and fill the void. We have a wonderful hotel site (at the Hotel Roanoke), and the people who came from all across North America for the Collaborating Across Borders V: An American-Canadian Dialogue on Interprofessional Healthcare and Practice, in 2015 really enjoyed it. As a relatively new medical school, we are excited about continuing our growing success in medical education; hosting the IAMSE meeting is a real honor for us.

What opportunities will attendees see in Roanoke that they’ve not seen in years past?
Roanoke is a beautiful city to have a conference. We‚Äôve localized the venue, which is a major goal for IAMSE. Attendees and exhibitors will appreciate the layout of the conference site. We are adjacent to the Roanoke Market Square with restaurants, breweries, and shopping featuring local items. There are just lots of opportunities for networking and entertainment. The program is outstanding with presentations and sessions on current and future challenges facing health sciences educators. International abstract submission is up, so more colleagues from other parts of the world may be attending. Increased student participation will be another highlight. This year, IAMSE is also hosting a Taste of Roanoke Street Fair which will replace the annual gala dinner. IAMSE 2019 is going to be a very easy conference to attend. If you can stay for the Grand Extravaganza on Tuesday afternoon it is going to be very special with a hiking trip to a beautiful location on the Blue Ridge Parkway and a visit to the Ballast Point brewery (East Coast operation) for dinner. 

Can you tell me more about this new event?
We are blocking off the Market Square in downtown Roanoke. We will have tastes of local food, beverages, and music. This is a chance to interact in a casual fun setting with lots of local food and a live band! It’s going to be a lot of fun.

What session or speaker are you most looking forward to this year?
I‚Äôm looking forward to, of course, the Board of Directors and Committee Chairs meeting.  I‚Äôve enjoyed being president and interacting with the Board and Committee Chairs in this planning session provides IAMSE with a sense of solid direction.  The plenary sessions also look very strong. I‚Äôm interested in the Gen Z session (Generation Z: The New Kids on the Block) and How to Use Disruptive Technology to Make Education Better – Not Just Different.

It sounds likes there is much to look forward to this year. Anything else you’d like to share?
The local response from the other medical schools in the area in support of the IAMSE meeting in Roanoke has been very strong.  As a new school, this is a tremendous opportunity for us and the other medical schools in the area to get better acquainted.

To learn more about the 2019 IAMSE Annual Meeting, including the plenary speakers, workshops and networking opportunities, or to register, please visitwww.IAMSEconference.org.

Reserve your spot before March 15 to ensure the Early Bird Discount!

IAMSE at GRIPE 2019 in New Orleans

The IAMSE booth will be exhibiting at the annual winter meeting of the Group for Research in Pathology Education (GRIPE) in New Orleans, LA on January 24-26, 2019. IAMSE Association Manager Julie Hewett will also be delivering a pre-conference workshop titled, ‚ÄúUsing Social Media to Disseminate Your Scholarly Work.‚ÄĚ If you plan on attending this meeting, don‚Äôt miss this session and do not forget to swing by the IAMSE booth and say hello!

Information on the GRIPE Meeting can be found here. We look forward to seeing you there!

Registration for the 23rd Annual IAMSE Meeting is Now Open!

We are pleased to announce that registration for the 23rd Annual Meeting of IAMSE, to be held June 8-11, 2019 in Roanoke, VA, USA, is now open. At this annual meeting of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) faculty, staff and students from around the world who are interested in medical science education join together in faculty development and networking opportunities. Sessions on curriculum development, assessment and simulation are among the common topics available at the annual meetings.


Featured plenary speakers include Don Cleveland, Claudia Krebs, Craig Lenz and Geoff Talmon.


Additional meeting details and registration can be found at http://www.iamseconference.org.

IAMSE Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 5 Highlights

Presenter: Megan Brown, Ph.D. Senior Research Associate in Medical Education Newcastle University

[The following blog was generated by Susan Ely and Doug McKell]

Navigating the Hidden Curriculum in Health Professions Education

The Learning Objectives for the fifth Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar on Teaching and Learning in Medical and Health Professions Education includes the following: First, understand
the hidden curriculum in health professions education, including its impact on students’
learning experiences and clinical practice. Second, identify the effect of the hidden curriculum
in clinical medicine, highlighting the mismatch between expectations and job requirements.
Third, recognize the complexity of the hidden curriculum, the potential adverse effects, and the
need to create a safe space for students to voice their concerns. Fourth, identify opportunities
for the hidden curriculum to enhance the student educational experience and promote
inclusivity.

Dr. Brown began by expanding upon the four objectives of her presentation. 1. Understanding
what the hidden curriculum is and is not. 2. Recognizing the hidden curriculum in daily
educational practice. 3. Identifying strategies for the hidden curriculum to enhance the impact
of teaching. 4. Reviewing resources and helpful hints for working with the hidden curriculum in
different health profession environments. Dr. Brown explained that she began her career as a
physician and now identifies as someone with a medical background who’s left clinical practice
to teach and research in health professions education. Dr. Brown described the impact of the
hidden curriculum during her training and when she qualified to practice as a physician. As a
disabled person working in clinical practice, she related that she wasn’t prepared for how the
hidden curriculum in healthcare impacted communication with and about her and other people
like her. This motivated her to obtain a Ph.D. in medical education and to leave clinical practice.

Dr. Brown discussed her research on the hidden curriculum and its relationship to identity
development and professionalism. She pointed out a gap between the theoretical knowledge of
the hidden curriculum, which is increasingly well-developed in the literature, and a deficit in
practice. For example, how does one translate an understanding of the hidden curriculum into
practice? How can the hidden curriculum be navigated to support students and learners in ways
that challenge some potentially negative impacts? To answer these questions, Dr. Brown
focused on understanding educational objectives and the curriculum as a roadmap for
education. She invoked a comprehensive plan that outlines the intended aims, objectives,
contents, and experiences that form an educational program. It encompasses all methods of
learning, teaching feedback, and supervision. Health professions education covers required
content and professional identity with greater detail to develop a learner’s knowledge, skills,
attitudes, and expertise.

Dr. Brown described how a broader perspective highlights other layers of education beyond this
explicit outline. The formal curriculum comprises the tangible, the measurable, the overt
components of an educational system and acts as the skeleton on which the body of the
learning experience is built. In addition to the formal curriculum, there is an informal
curriculum, which tends to occur in workplaces or clinical settings. Dr. Brown stressed that
there are differences between the informal and hidden curricula, with the informal curriculum
being opportunistic, idiosyncratic, and unplanned. Dr. Brown pointed out that the informal
curriculum acts similarly to the formal curriculum by emphasizing what teachers think students
should know. She then referred to Hafferty’s (1998) definition of the hidden curriculum as ‚ÄúThe
unwritten rules, values, and patterns of behavior that students learn and are expected to conform to whilst learning.‚ÄĚ It is the unintended, unofficial learning that students absorb
through education. She pointed out that the hidden curriculum involves tacit messaging about
what is and isn’t important. These messages can influence students both positively and
negatively.

Dr. Brown continued to emphasize that educators’ current understanding of the hidden
curriculum in the health professions involves appreciating that what is implicitly taught in the
hidden curriculum is just as impactful as what is explicitly taught in the formal curriculum. It
shapes knowledge and professional identity by reinforcing social norms, values, behaviors, and
ethical perspectives. She referred to a scoping review of the hidden curriculum by Sarikhani et
al. (2020), which identified four main categories: 1. structural factors, 2. educational factors, 3.
cultural factors, and 4. social factors. The structural factors include the organizational
frameworks and roles within educational institutions that subtly dictate the expected behaviors
and priorities of medical students and educators and educational practices. The educational
factors include the way we teach. The cultural factors refer to prevailing attitudes, values, and
norms in educational settings that informally influence learners’ perceptions and identities.
Social factors influence the dynamics of interpersonal relationships and role models’ choices.
Dr. Brown noted that this is an example where the impact of identity and social factors is linked
to interpersonal relationships. She also referred to the influence of role models, which
significantly affect students’ learning and professional conduct in the healthcare environment.

Dr. Brown then asked that the hidden curriculum be considered in four ways: 1. What happens
in corridor conversations (what is said and not said)? 2. How do organizations behave when
confronted with controversy? 3. What types of direct and indirect stereotyping exist? 4. What is
being accessed as valuable faculty and student performance? She stated that the hidden
curriculum must be navigated in a very intentional manner. She gave examples of the design of
anatomy labs that reinforce learning silos, the lack of age, sex, and racial diversity represented
in printed material, and the gender and body type bias in clinical training for physical
examinations. Dr. Brown stressed that this lack of diversity sends strong messages within
medicine and healthcare, thus perpetuating this under-representation. In her experience, the
hidden curriculum can perpetuate traditional hierarchies and intimidate students from
questioning authority or contributing valuable input. Eventually, this can lead to burnout and
stress, especially when the hidden curriculum emphasizes overwork and the expectation of
constant availability. Furthermore, there can often be unintended bias and discrimination. The
hidden curriculum reinforces resistance to change, can discourage innovation, and can promote
adherence to outdated practices if not identified and addressed.

Dr. Brown also pointed out some positive aspects of the hidden curriculum. For example,
positive role modeling and informal mentorship play a big part in making the experiences of the
hidden curriculum constructive. It can instill empathy and sell compassion to students, which is
crucial for patient-centered care. She then highlighted four ways to identify the hidden
curriculum. These are to observe, reflect, seek, and review. She indicated that it is imperative to
carefully observe signs that represent the hidden curriculum. Dr. Brown strongly suggested we
should become very aware of the language used, recognize nonverbal cues, and identify the reward or discourage behavior in the work environment. Do these observations align with or
contradict the formally taught curriculum? This line of questioning can reveal much about the
implicit values being communicated. She challenged educators to critically reflect on what’s
being conveyed as necessary by the formal curriculum and examine their priorities in their
teaching and student interactions. Similarly, she stressed carefully evaluating discrepancies
between what’s being said and what’s being done. Finally, Dr. Brown encouraged the
promotion of an open dialogue through anonymous feedback mechanisms, reflective
assignments, focus groups, or other formats that can be included in teaching. The last step, the
review of the hidden curriculum, is completing a formal critical look at institutional policies and
procedures. She encouraged introspection about the language used with students and the
procedures students are asked to perform. What messages do these send? Does the institution
have policies that inadvertently place certain student groups at a disadvantage? Dr. Brown
suggested that awareness and understanding of those elements can aid in identifying areas that
will help align those hidden and implicit messages with the institution’s educational goals.

Dr. Brown asked the audience to reflect on their engagement with the hidden curriculum. How
do the actions of educators influence learners? Are educators demonstrating the conduct that
they articulate? How are any discrepancies revealed by these reflections addressed? Lastly, Dr.
Brown asked the audience to consider what lessons students might be learning from their
faculty’s positive and negative conduct. Once these reflections have been considered,
educators can consider the root causes of what has been discovered and seek to address or
change those lessons. In summarizing, Dr. Brown listed four actions to address the challenge of
the hidden curriculum. These were to integrate reflective practice, support critical
consciousness development, support inclusivity, and foster a culture of feedback because, as
she pointed out in her final slide, … “What is taught is not learned, and what is learned is not
taught‚Ķsometimes [the Hidden Curriculum] is hiding in plain sight.‚ÄĚ


References:
Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education. New York, NY: Macmillan.
Hafferty, F. W., & Franks, R. (1994). The Hidden Curriculum, Ethics Teaching, And The Structure Of
Medical Education. Academic Medicine, 69(11), 861-871.
Hafferty, F. W. (1998). Beyond curriculum reform: Confronting medicine’s hidden curriculum. Academic
Medicine, 73,403‚Äď407.
Jackson, P. (1974). Life in Classrooms. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
Landreman, L.M., Rasmussen, C.J., King, P.M. and Jiang, C.X., 2007. A phenomenological study of the
development of university educators’ critical consciousness. Journal of College Student Development,
48(3), pp.275-296.
Lempp, H., & Seale, C. (2004). The hidden curriculum in undergraduate medical education: A qualitative
study of medical students‚Äô perceptions of teaching. BMJ, 329, 770‚Äď773.
Martin J., R. (1994). What should we do with a hidden curriculum when we find one? In: Martin J., R.
Ed. Changing the Educational Landscape: Philosophy, Women, and Curriculum. New York, NY: Routledge Sarikhani, Y., Shojaei, P., Rafiee, M. et al. Analyzing the interaction of main components of the hidden
curriculum in medical education using interpretive structural modeling method. BMC Med Educ 20, 176
(2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-020-02094-5
Wear, D., & Skillicorn, J. (2009). Hidden in Plain Sight: The Formal, Informal and Hidden Curricula of a
Psychiatry Clerkship. Academic Medicine, 84(4), 451-458.



You Don’t Want to Miss Your Chance for Faculty Development at #IAMSE24!

The International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) is dedicated to offering thought-provoking, educational, and investment-worthy professional development sessions for its Annual Conference. A¬†Pre-Conference Faculty Development Workshop is 3 or 6 hours in length with limited enrollment and an additional registration fee. The workshops combine appropriate amounts of didactic presentation with significant ‚Äúhands-on‚ÄĚ opportunities for participants. For the participants, a certificate of attendance will be available after completion of the course if needed.

All Pre-Conference Workshops take place on Saturday, June 15, 2024. If you are already registered for the conference and want to add a pre-conference workshop to your schedule, you may do so by modifying your schedule. To modify your registration, click here!

Full-Day Pre-Conference Workshops

Educational Video Skills Development for Healthcare Educators
8:00 AM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The workshop will empower healthcare educators to have confidence in skills necessary to create, edit, evaluate and distribute high quality educational videos for instructional purposes. The aim is to involve participants in hands-on activities that will be memorable and relevant to improve their current educational practices.
Presented by: 

Malli Barremkala
Suzan Kamel-ElSayed
James Grogan
Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Medicine: From Curriculum to Classroom to Learner Assessment
8:00 AM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers from other institutions to facilitate creative and shared problem-solving to promote and assess learner cognitive integration of basic science and clinical medicine.
Presented by: 

Leslie Fall
David Harris
Julie Kerry
Kate Miller
Khiet Ngo
James Nixon
Leah
 Sheridan
Amy Wilson-Delfosse

Morning Pre-Conference Workshops

Developing a Statement on the Use of Artificial Intelligence in Medical Education
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of this workshop is to expand participants’ knowledge and experience with natural language processing and explore application of these technologies in the context of medical education.
Presented by: 

Marina Diioia
Matthew Laye
Launa Lynch
LaToya Woods
Developing Resilient Mindsets in Health Professions Students
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of the workshop is to Resilient Mindsets in Medicine is to equip faculty to create more motivationally-supportive learning environments. Faculty will learn how to leverage the power of learning mindsets in ways that can support students to be more resilient and less likely to burnout.
Presented by: 

Kenn Barron
Alliyah Francis
Zachary 
Himmelberger
Yoi Tibbetts
Mark Speicher
Open-Ended Questions in the Integrated Medical Curriculum: A Practical Approach
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

This workshop will allow participants to identify different types of open-ended questions, create integrated, open-ended questions linked to specific learning objectives, create and use an analytic scoring rubric, explain a process for standard-setting and the assigning of grades, and discuss the implications of emerging artificial intelligence technology for medical school assessment.
Presented by: 

Jeffrey Bird
Judith Brenner
Robert Hill
Doreen Olvet
Using Micro-Scholarship to Incentivize Faculty Professional Development
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The intent of this workshop is to not only provide the concept, tools, and application of Micro-Scholarship and the struggles of incentivizing faculty development but to work as a cohort to develop a consensus statement to be published in a journal with a recommendation on the urgency to incentivize faculty development and how it can advance health professions education. 
Presented by: 

Ennid Duran Gonzalez
Alice Fornari
Poh-Sun Goh
Charles Gullo
Sol Roberts-Lieb
Elisabeth Schlegel

Afternoon Pre-Conference Workshops

Ask, Answer, Disseminate: Your Roadmap to Educational Scholarship
12:15 PM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

In this workshop the facilitators will provide a framework for educational scholarship. Participants will then identify a personal educational scholarship project and develop a plan to complete and disseminate it while receiving guidance from experienced faculty members.
Presented by: 

Tameka Clemons
Kimberly Dahlman
Bonny Dickinson
Martha Faner
Leading for the Future: Values, Mindfulness, and Allyship in Academia
12:15 PM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of this workshop is to help medical educators develop into leaders and allies – identifying their values, built out of their unique lived experience, by providing a safe forum to discuss challenges and identify solutions.
Presented by: 

Heather Christensen
Carrie Elzie
Aaron Marshall

To learn more about all of the sessions that the IAMSE Conference has to offer, please visit us at www.IAMSEConference.org. If there are any questions that our website cannot answer, please reach out to us at support@iamse.org. As a reminder, if you are already registered and want to add a pre-conference workshop to your schedule, you may modify your registration by clicking here. 

IAMSE Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 4 Highlights

Presenter: Yoi Tibbetts, Ph.D. Research Director at Motivate Lab and Assistant Professor of Education at the University of Virginia
Zach Himmelberger, Ph.D. Lead Data Science Manager at Motivate Lab
Kenn Barron, Ph.D. Fellow at Motivate Lab and Professor of Psychology and Director of the Motivation Research Institute at James Madison University

[The following blog was generated by Susan Ely and Doug McKell]

Student Motivation and Well-Being in Medical School and the Resilient Mindsets in Medicine Initiative

The Learning Objectives for the fourth Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar series on Teaching and
Learning in Medical and Health Professions Education includes the following: First, identify and
understand the challenges to medical student well-being, focusing on burnout. Second,
describe a possible solution using the Mindset GPS concept and review the data supporting this
approach. Third, review ways to implement a solution, specifically the Resilient Mindsets in
Medicine Initiative.

Dr. Barron began the webinar by asking the attendees to respond to two questions about
working with medical students. First, attendees were asked about their experience in increasing
students’ motivation and, second, what conceptual model or framework they used. After completing the polling, he reviewed the webinar‚Äôs three objectives again, listing how he and his
colleagues would frame their presentations. Dr. Himmelberger began by describing
comprehensive AACOM survey data on medical student well-being. Next, Dr. Tibbetts described
a motivation framework called Mindset GPS. Finally, Dr. Barron concluded by reviewing the
Resilient Mindsets in Medicine Initiative program.

Dr. Himmelberger began by describing the burnout crisis that is a significant driver of poor
mental health among healthcare professionals. He acknowledged that the COVID pandemic
increased burnout, with an estimated 40% of healthcare professionals affected in 2021. The
problem predates COVID, however, and physician burnout hasn’t dropped post-pandemic. He
indicated that COVID might have worsened professional burnout but that it isn’t a problem
caused by COVID. It is, instead, a persistent and multifaceted system problem seen for many
years; it is both a societal and an ethical problem. Dr. Himmelberger continued to stress that
solutions must be multifaceted. Because the root cause of this problem is at the system level,
solutions need to address how we train physicians and support them in the workforce. This
problem starts very early. Physicians who enter the workforce are already experiencing
burnout. Residents and medical students face high burnout as well. In particular, medical
students are facing higher rates of emotional exhaustion, an aspect of burnout where one feels
both physically and emotionally drained, often as a result of consistent stress over a long
period. Because medical school creates consistent stress over a long period, the result is
documented poor mental health in medical students with very high rates of depression.

Dr. Himmelberger continued by presenting data collected through a partnership with the
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) that surveyed all
matriculating and graduating osteopathic medical students in the United States during
the 2022-23 academic year. The survey included 75.5% (N = 7407) of all matriculating
students and 50.1% (N = 3996) of all graduating students. It revealed that burnout was
significantly associated with moderate-to-severe psychological symptoms. It also
demonstrated that students who failed COMLEX Level 1 or COMLEX Level 2 on their first
attempt had significantly higher burnout scores than students who passed either exam
on their first attempt. They also more often failed to match into desired residency
positions.

In conclusion, Dr. Himmelberger stated that medical students face significant burnout,
which seems to worsen throughout medical school. These findings are consistent with
those of allopathic medical students and students in other healthcare professions.
Burnout is associated with poor mental health, worse performance on board exams, and
a lower likelihood of getting a top residency match.

Dr. Tibbetts began his presentation by describing learning mindsets, which are students’
beliefs about themselves and the learning environment. His research at Motivate Lab has
focused on three characteristics that create the acronym GPS; much like a cellphone GPS,

this helps users locate and map where they want to go. The G stands for Growth
Mindset, the theory that intelligence can be developed through hard work, practical
strategies, and help from others as needed. According to this theory, mistakes are not an
indictment of one’s intelligence. The Growth Mindset promotes room for growth and
improvement. It emphasizes that students can learn from their mistakes if they work
hard and implement effective strategies. The P in Mindset GPS stands for Purpose and
Relevance, reinforcing the belief that one’s schoolwork is valuable because it is
connected to a larger purpose and is relevant to one’s life. The S stands for Sense of
Belonging, the belief that one is connected to and respected by peers, cared for by
teachers and mentors, and fits with the culture. The Motivate Lab research focuses on
these three specific mindsets or motivational constructs. It is based on compelling
evidence from decades of research demonstrating that learning mindsets are meaningful
concepts related to academic success and students’ well-being.

Dr. Tibbetts then shifted his presentation to four reasons to support learning mindsets.
They are Meaningful and related to academic success and students’ well-being. They are
Measurable – they can be accessed and tracked. They are Malleable ‚Äď they can be
altered through targeted activities and changes in the educational context, and they are
More Effective – meaning that learning mindset interventions can be powerful and
improve outcomes for students from traditionally marginalized groups (e.g., Black,
Latine, Indigenous, and 1st generation college attendees). How is this measured? The
first way to measure learning mindsets is to attempt to understand what’s happening in
the student’s head. To what extent do they endorse a growth mindset? Are they
perceiving purpose or relevance? Do they feel a sense of belonging? The second is to
assess the ‚Äúpsychological air‚ÄĚ around them, i.e., does the classroom context support a
growth mindset purpose and a sense of belonging? Is it evident that the instructors
believe in a growth mindset and that mistakes are viewed as an opportunity for growth?
Is the purpose and relevance of the curriculum apparent?

Based on the AACOM survey data, about 30% of entering osteopathic medical students
are already reporting moderate to severe psychological symptoms that are associated
with psychiatric disorders. When they graduate, over half of these medical students
report moderate to severe psychological symptoms related to psychiatric disorders. This
underscores the belief that the psychological air within the medical school context
doesn’t seem to be very adaptive, particularly when we’re looking at the psychological
symptoms related to psychiatric disorders. Dr. Tibbetts concluded his portion of the
webinar by emphasizing that faculty whose teaching and assignments employed GPS
strategies had students’ feelings of burnout decrease by as much as 30-40%, with a
concomitant reduction in maladaptive psychological symptoms.

Dr. Barron concluded the session by repeating the evidence that these measures of GPS
are even more effective for students from historically marginalized backgrounds. He
stressed that the stronger the perceptions of purpose and relevance that can be created
for students, the more purpose and relevance they perceive within their studies, and the
more psychological symptoms diminish. He described implementing the Resilient
Mindsets in Medicine program to address what faculty and administration identified as
the most significant medical school stressors, i.e., exams for courses during the first
semester and the first licensing exam (COMLEX Level 1 or Step 1). Given this information,
Dr. Barron’s team created a program explicitly designed to build better student learning
connections to master the material for early exams and pass the first licensing exam. The
faculty training program for this initiative is divided into two parts, the most significant
being online training modules. The first part of the course introduces the learning
mindset GPS and how to adopt it in instructional strategies and messaging, emphasizing
knowledge and skill. They are currently piloting a program to help faculty implement
these ideas.

Dr Barron then described the four specific activities in the faculty course. The first is to
develop a transparent preparation guide to share with students to provide information
about assignments and exams. The second activity is course communication, i.e.,
announcements regarding exams and communications with struggling students. He
noted the importance of using encouraging language to give students hope that they can
succeed. The third activity is the creation of an “exam wrapper“ for use both before and
after exams. This involves conceptually wrapping the exam between how the student
prepared for it and then, after the exam, helping them reflect on what worked and what
didn’t. The fourth task is a connections activity that helps students answer the following
questions: What am I learning in any given course? How is that connected to other
classes? How is what I am learning linked to prepare me for board exams? Dr. Barron’s
research group created these four strategies for their faculty training course to address
low medical student motivation, improve mental well-being, and reduce stress.

Dr. Barron concluded the webinar by saying that faculty should consider adopting an
active learning strategy that promotes a G or P or an S or use any other pedagogy already
supporting GPS. He ended by listing several active learning resources, including a curated
list by D. Kevin Yee of 289 Active Learning Techniques;
www.usf.edu/atle/documents/handout-interactive-techniques.pdf. He also
recommended James Lang’s book, Teaching Small (2016, Jossey-Bass), as an excellent
example of making incremental changes in teaching approaches to produce significant
results in student learning.

References

  1. Sexton JB, Adair KC, Proulx J, et al. Emotional Exhaustion Among US Health Care Workers
    Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic, 2019-2021. JAMA Netw Open.
    2022;5(9):e2232748. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.32748
  2. Agerbo, E., Gunnell, D., Bonde, J. P., Mortensen, P. B., & Nordentoft, M. (2007). Suicide
    and occupation: the impact of socio-economic, demographic and psychiatric differences.
    Psychological medicine, 37(8), 1131‚Äď1140. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291707000487
  3. Shanafelt, Tait D. MD; Balch, Charles M. MD†‡; Bechamps, Gerald MD†§; Russell, Tom MD†; Dyrbye, Lotte MD; Satele, Daniel BA; Collicott, Paul MD†; Novotny, Paul J. MS;
    Sloan, Jeff PhD*; Freischlag, Julie MD†‡. Burnout and Medical Errors Among American
    Surgeons. Annals of Surgery 251(6):p 995-1000, June 2010. | DOI:
    10.1097/SLA.0b013e3181bfdab3
  4. Fares, J., Al Tabosh, H., Saadeddin, Z., El Mouhayyar, C., & Aridi, H. (2016). Stress, Burnout
    and Coping Strategies in Preclinical Medical Students. North American journal of medical
    sciences, 8(2), 75‚Äď81.
    https://doi.org/10.4103/1947-2714.177299
  5. Fitzpatrick, O., Biesma, R., Conroy, R. M., & McGarvey, A. (2019). Prevalence and
    relationship between burnout and depression in our future doctors: a cross-sectional study
    in a cohort of preclinical and clinical medical students in Ireland. BMJ open, 9(4), e023297.
    https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-023297
  6. Rotenstein LS, Ramos MA, Torre M, et al. Prevalence of Depression, Depressive Symptoms,
    and Suicidal Ideation Among Medical Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
    JAMA. 2016;316(21):2214‚Äď2236. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.17324



IAMSE Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 3 Highlights

Presenter: Shannon Jimenez, DO, MPE, FACOFP Dean, Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine
&
Kara Sawarynski, PhD. Sarah Lerchenfeldt, PharmD, Tracey A.H. Taylor, PhD, and Stefanie Attardi, PhD. Department of Foundational Medical Studies William Beaumont School of Medicine Oakland University

[The following blog was generated by Susan Ely and Doug McKell]

Communication Differences among Generations

The Learning Objectives for the second Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar series on Teaching and
Learning in Medical and Health Professions Education includes the following: First, discern the generational differences and how they affect communication. Second, recognize the history and sociology behind differences among generations. Third, remember the dominant communication preferences of each generational group. Fourth, develop strategies to design and deliver health professions education to meet the needs of Gen Z learners.

Dr. Jimenez began her presentation by outlining the primary communication preferences of each of the five identified generation age groups, specifically Traditional, those born before 1945, Baby Boomers born 1945-1965, Generation X (Xers, or Gen X) born 1965 -1980,  Generation Y (Gen Y or Millennials) born 1980 ‚Äď 1996, and Generation Z born 1996 ‚Äď 2012. She focused on the critical points of difference and emphasized the communication choices of each group.

Dr. Jimenez described the traits of the Traditional Generation in the following ways. They are known as ‚ÄúThe Silent Generation‚ÄĚ for being more formal, stoic, risk-averse, and for prioritizing duty. They let their actions speak louder than words and expect others to understand their behavior. For this reason, they make decisions based on what worked in the past, focusing on values,  respect, stability, order, and practicality. When speaking to the Traditional Generation, use formal communication, i.e., letters or emails. They can be counted on to respond and will be direct, polite, and respectful, using thank-you notes and personal expressions to convey their feelings and interests.

Dr. Jimenez emphasized that Baby Boomers respect authority but only sometimes trust it. Many are very accepting of diversity, and they tend to be optimistic. They also tend to be more politically liberal, conflict-avoidant, and relationship-oriented.  Baby Boomers value directness, respect, and optimism.  Boomers value hard work and innovation, prioritizing relationships and questioning the status quo. When speaking to Boomers, be diplomatic and avoid confrontation, as confrontation can be interpreted as disrespect. Speak to their sense of righteousness and their contributions to the greater good.

The critical issue for Gen X is that they grew up in a period of financial insecurity, with both parents working and limited wage mobility, leading them to question authority and walk away from the workaholic lifestyle of the previous generation. According to Dr. Jimenez, they value a balance between work and life. They tend to be fiercely independent, entrepreneurial, pragmatic, and creative. They value actions more than words, although slightly less so than the baby boomers, and they value accomplishments more than money. When communicating with Gen X, realize that their words can sound harsh. They are less formal and more to the point. They prefer in-person communication or a phone call. They need to be reminded to give and take feedback and use empathy.

Because of the significant digital communication experience Millennials have grown up with, they tend to have a slightly shorter attention span. They are very used to things being clear and well-categorized, and they much prefer it that way. Millennials tend to expect a rapid return of information. For example, Millennials will send a presentation for review to educators via email, and they expect at least an acknowledgment of the receipt. They prefer digital communication rather than phone calls. Millennials also tend to be less formal in communication and seek connectivity with coworkers and bosses outside of work. By and large, they are confident and optimistic idealists for whom words mean more than actions. They are good at teamwork but have correspondingly high expectations from authority figures. Overall, they have a shorter attention span and place exceptional value on achieving a work-life balance.

The Generation Z (Gen Z) cohort values hard work, initiative, and contributions to the greater good. Dr. Jimenez pointed out that Gen Z members are known as technological idealists and social justice warriors. They value meaning and are motivated to contribute positively to the next generation; they are the most racially and ethnically diverse generation in history. They embrace diversity and expect their leaders and institutions to do the same. They perceive that the world is smaller because of technology, and they use technology for communication more than any other generation. A key trait for Gen Z individuals is that while they are Digital Natives, their trust must be earned. As social justice warriors, they want to be part of the greater good and, when doing so, value effectiveness over convenience. Dr. Jimenez noted that Gen Z members prefer face-to-face communication, expect digital communication from school/teachers, and require frequent feedback or check-ins to see how they are doing.

Exploring Best Practices in Health Profession Education for Gen Z Students

Dr. Sawarynski began her presentation by reminding everyone that generation classifications are broad categories that are not scientifically defined. They can lead to stereotyping and oversimplification, and discussions too often focus on differences instead of similarities. Despite these cautions, she and her colleagues strongly believe that reflecting on the experiences and perspectives our students bring to their education can help us understand how our student populations have changed over time and improve the medical education environment for everyone. Data from the AAMC matriculating student questionnaire from 2016 to 2023 indicate that age group cohort breakdowns haven‚Äôt changed over time. The average age of the entering medical student is still 23 years old. Although their average age hasn’t changed, the generation that they belong to has dramatically changed. Most current first-year student classes belong to the Gen Z generation.

Dr. Sawarynski continued by pointing out that based on several national data sets, Gen Z students have had a drastically different set of social experiences than many previous generations. For example, there has been a steep decline in the percentage of students obtaining their driver’s license by the time they’re in 12th grade, and in alcohol use, part-time work, having sex, dating, and a whole range of social experiences. Because significant technological shifts drive many generational cut-off points at the beginning of new generations, monumental advances in communication patterns have affected how we meet, connect, and communicate. Today’s online connections for Gen Z students differ significantly from previous generations. Dr. Sawarynski emphasized that Gen Z individuals are comfortable reaching out and communicating with friends, peers, and people they may only know through online connections, including affinity groups.  This interaction with all kinds of social media groups can be drastically different from the communication experiences the medical school faculty had at the same age. In addition, Internet technology allows constant communication with peers throughout the day. The result is that students can participate in parallel dialogues even while in the classroom. The result is that those present need to think about what is happening in person versus what is potentially happening simultaneously via electronic communication.

Dr. Lerchenfeldt began by highlighting a concerning trend in mental health among young people. She presented national data reporting that the prevalence of critical-level depression among teens and young adults has more than doubled from 2011 to 2021. In only 16 years, the rate of clinical depression has doubled in US teens and young adults. By 2021, nearly 30% of teen girls and 12% of teen boys were reported to suffer from clinical-level depression. She focused on Generation Z, individuals born from the late 1990s to the early 2000s times, who are particularly facing serious mental illness, especially the oldest members of Gen Z, those aged 18 to 25. They exhibit a strikingly high prevalence of mental health illness at 11.4%, about twice as high as the general population.  A 2018 meta-analysis published in 2018 synthesized data from 69 studies with over 45,000 medical students. It reported the global prevalence of anxiety in students was 33%, three times higher than in the general population. Some of the factors contributing to this high percentage included the intense academic workload, sleep deprivation, financial burdens, and exposure to patient deaths. The same study reported medical student depression at 30%  and burnout at 37%.

Dr. Lerchenfeldt continued by discussing communicating with Gen Z students who value equality, social justice, and transparency. As a result, they want fairness and inclusivity from their education, and they have a greater awareness of mental health. That might mean expanded mental health services, on-demand counseling, and curriculum integration, including wellness and self-care literacy.  She reminded everyone that Gen Z individuals value autonomy and want to be involved in decision-making with clear communication and personalized collaboration.  Gen Z students prefer a flexible, self-paced environment that integrates technology and offers opportunities for collaboration. She asked, ‚ÄúHow can we address this as educators?‚ÄĚ She discussed using backward design to focus on desired learning outcomes before choosing our instructional method. She also invoked the need for transparency and explanation of selected instructional strategies and learning goals so students can better understand and engage with the educational material. This brings up a couple of additional questions. What does engagement in the hybrid or asynchronous learning environment look like? Does it involve flexibility and modification of course materials? Does it include in-person and online interactions like discussions and digital forums? In an asynchronous environment, does it allow students to use content they believe is essential to understand these preferences? Students expect a robust support system and medical education. Educators should consider more highly developed digital literacy for their Gen Z communication preferences, engaging them with higher-quality visual and interactive content.

Dr. Lerchenfeldt continued the webinar by reminding us that the end goal is to develop health professionals who can be successful in intergenerational clinics. Educators could think about building useful toolbox-type things within the curriculum, being very intentional about when, why, and how to be transparent about in-person events. Feedback on skills should be offered, keeping in mind what is relevant to the practice of future physicians. For example, can we deliberately and transparently incorporate these ideas and practices into our curriculum in new places not previously considered? Integration of role models for interpersonal and team skills across generations also needs consideration.

All three speakers emphasized the need for educators to support students’ mental health given the following realities:

Many students will spend more time with educators than any other university employee.

Mental health issues may appear on the surface as professionalism issues (e.g., missed deadlines, absenteeism, lack of care with instructions)

While faculty members must work within their qualifications and roles, all educators canseek to understand signs of distress in students, be aware of campus mental health resources and keep their materials readily available (e.g., brochures, QR codes), refer students to the appropriate personnel (e.g., counseling center, dean of students) be aware of campus emergency contacts and reporting procedures, and model self-care, as applicable.

The webinar concluded with two final thoughts from the speakers. First, continue to seek and embrace change. Consider whether or not educators are adapting at the same rate as the available technology our students already use. Explore opportunities to empower students to teach faculty members. Ask students for their perspective on how new tools, ideas,  resources, etc., meet their needs. The speakers encouraged involving student representatives, soliciting their concerns and ideas as an acknowledgment of the vast differences between their experiences and ours. Second, work to be transparent whenever possible. Sound pedagogical reasons for doing things a certain way may be present, but students may have different understandings. Being transparent can go a long way to help bridge those gaps.



IAMSE Fellowship 2024 Conference Cohort Now Accepting Applications

IAMSE is pleased to announce that applications for the 2023 Medical Educator Fellowship (MEF) Program are now being accepted! IAMSE is once again offering members and non-members the option of beginning the MEF Program during the IAMSE Annual Conference. 

The primary goal of the MEF is to support the development of well-rounded healthcare education scholars through a program of targeted professional development and application of learned concepts to mentored research projects. The program is designed for healthcare educators from all backgrounds who wish to enhance their knowledge and productivity as educational scholars.

Please note applicants are required to have completed the Fundamentals in Health Professions Education (Fundamentals) OR the Essential Skills in Medical Education (ESME) Program as a prerequisite. For more detailed information about the program, please visit the information on our website at http://www.iamse.org/fellowship-program/.

Applicants for the next cohort will be accepted until May 1, 2024. To submit your application, please click here. For questions about the Fellowship or how to apply, please contact support@iamse.org. We thank you for your interest and look forward to supporting you in achieving your professional goals in educational scholarship.

Last Chance to Submit Your Application for the IAMSE 2024 IM-REACH Program!

Don’t miss your opportunity to be a part of the 2024 cohort of the IAMSE Mentoring Certificate Program (IM-REACH)! 

Mentoring students, postdocs, and faculty and guiding their work is crucial for their success in diverse career paths that encompass leadership, clinical and educational roles. The IAMSE Mentoring Certificate program is a productive way to prepare for a role as mentors and support mentees in their career paths and academic pursuits. Mentorship is a skill for both the mentor and mentee, a true dynamic relationship that is a journey in pursuit of career engagement and success.

The IM-REACH certificate program provides an opportunity to enhance skills, gain experience, and engage in reflection and growth as a mentor and ultimately influence your relationship with your mentee. The goal of this program is to develop well-rounded, diverse health professional education mentors through targeted professional development in key aspects of mentorship, which includes both knowledge and skills. The program will provide evidence of that mentorship leads to specialized achievement that enhances and supports career advancement for both mentors and mentees. 

  • Participants will complete a one-year certificate program with a scholarly project related to their professional needs as a mentor or as an educational leader supporting mentorship programs with mentors and mentees.
  • Participants will complete a validated mentoring assessment pre- and post-program in order to demonstrate growth, comfort, and knowledge gained.
  • Participants will keep a reflective journal detailing the experiences of a current mentor/mentee relationship in order to guide their learning and growth as a mentor/mentee. This will be debriefed with a program leader in individual sessions.
  • The year-long certificate focuses on the dual role of mentors and mentees in establishing a mentor/mentee relationship;  this journey will explore how the mentees roles evolve based on the developmental stage and goals of the mentee in one or more areas of their career.

The program will include every other month group workshops based on content from the IAMSE mentoring manual (virtual). The alternating months will be a one-on-one meet-up with a program leader/facilitator to address individual needs as a mentor and mentorship on the program project. It will conclude one year later with a three-hour workshop at IAMSE (virtual or face-to-face) to wrap up the program. Here, fellows will present their final project to the group with the goal of eventually presenting as a poster at the IAMSE Conference the following year. 

Applicants for this cohort will be accepted until April 1, 2024. All accepted applicants will be informed by April 15, 2024. Payment must be submitted to IAMSE by May 1, 2024. You may submit your application by clicking here. For questions about the IM-REACH Program or how to apply, please contact support@iamse.org. We thank you for your interest and look forward to supporting you in achieving your professional goals in educational scholarship.

Looking for Professional Development Options for the IAMSE 2024 Conference?

he International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) is dedicated to offering thought-provoking, educational, and investment-worthy professional development sessions for its Annual Conference. A Pre-Conference Faculty Development Workshop is 3 or 6 hours in length with limited enrollment and an additional registration fee. The workshops combine appropriate amounts of didactic presentation with significant ‚Äúhands-on‚ÄĚ opportunities for participants. For the participants, a certificate of attendance will be available after completion of the course if needed.

Please note that all Pre-Conference Workshops take place on Saturday, June 15, 2024. 

Full-Day Pre-Conference Workshops

Educational Video Skills Development for Healthcare Educators
8:00 AM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The workshop will empower healthcare educators to have confidence in skills necessary to create, edit, evaluate and distribute high quality educational videos for instructional purposes. The aim is to involve participants in hands-on activities that will be memorable and relevant to improve their current educational practices.
Presented by: 

Malli Barremkala
Suzan Kamel-ElSayed
James Grogan
Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Medicine: From Curriculum to Classroom to Learner Assessment
8:00 AM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers from other institutions to facilitate creative and shared problem-solving to promote and assess learner cognitive integration of basic science and clinical medicine.
Presented by: 

Leslie Fall
David Harris
Julie Kerry
Kate Miller
Khiet Ngo
James Nixon
Leah
 Sheridan
Amy Wilson-Delfosse

Morning Pre-Conference Workshops

Developing a Statement on the Use of Artificial Intelligence in Medical Education
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of this workshop is to expand participants’ knowledge and experience with natural language processing and explore application of these technologies in the context of medical education.
Presented by: 

Marina Diioia
Matthew Laye
Launa Lynch
LaToya Woods
Developing Resilient Mindsets in Health Professions Students
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of the workshop is to Resilient Mindsets in Medicine is to equip faculty to create more motivationally-supportive learning environments. Faculty will learn how to leverage the power of learning mindsets in ways that can support students to be more resilient and less likely to burnout.
Presented by: 

Kenn Barron
Alliyah Francis
Zachary 
Himmelberger
Yoi Tibbetts
Mark Speicher
Open-Ended Questions in the Integrated Medical Curriculum: A Practical Approach
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

This workshop will allow participants to identify different types of open-ended questions, create integrated, open-ended questions linked to specific learning objectives, create and use an analytic scoring rubric, explain a process for standard-setting and the assigning of grades, and discuss the implications of emerging artificial intelligence technology for medical school assessment.
Presented by: 

Jeffrey Bird
Judith Brenner
Robert Hill
Doreen Olvet
Using Micro-Scholarship to Incentivize Faculty Professional Development
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The intent of this workshop is to not only provide the concept, tools, and application of Micro-Scholarship and the struggles of incentivizing faculty development but to work as a cohort to develop a consensus statement to be published in a journal with a recommendation on the urgency to incentivize faculty development and how it can advance health professions education. 
Presented by: 

Ennid Duran Gonzalez
Alice Fornari
Poh-Sun Goh
Charles Gullo
Sol Roberts-Lieb
Elisabeth Schlegel

Afternoon Pre-Conference Workshops

Ask, Answer, Disseminate: Your Roadmap to Educational Scholarship
12:15 PM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

In this workshop the facilitators will provide a framework for educational scholarship. Participants will then identify a personal educational scholarship project and develop a plan to complete and disseminate it while receiving guidance from experienced faculty members.
Presented by: 

Tameka Clemons
Kimberly Dahlman
Bonny Dickinson
Martha Faner
Leading for the Future: Values, Mindfulness, and Allyship in Academia
12:15 PM – 3:15 PM CDT (UTC‚ąí05:00)

The purpose of this workshop is to help medical educators develop into leaders and allies – identifying their values, built out of their unique lived experience, by providing a safe forum to discuss challenges and identify solutions.
Presented by: 

Heather Christensen
Carrie Elzie
Aaron Marshall

To learn more about all of the sessions that the IAMSE Conference has to offer, please visit us at www.IAMSEConference.org. If there are any questions that our website cannot answer, please reach out to us at support@iamse.org. If you are already registered and want to add a pre-conference workshop to your schedule, you may modify your registration by clicking here

Don’t forget to register before the Early Bird deadline on Friday, April 1 to receive a discount on registration costs!

IAMSE Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 2 Highlights

Presenter: Carrie Tibbles, M.D., Director of Graduate Medical Education, Designated Institutional Officer Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston, MA

[The following blog was generated by Susan Ely and Doug McKell]

Teaching Professionalism: Strategies for the Frontline

The Learning Objectives for the second Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar series on Teaching and
Learning in Medical and Health Professions Education include the following: First, define
professionalism and the process of integrating professional values. Second, review real-time
strategies to address episodes of unprofessional behavior. Third, identify struggling learners
and strategies for remediation and intervention. Fourth, develop a systematic approach to
interventions for learners with academic difficulties and professional or behavioral issues.

Dr. Tibbles began her presentation by focusing on improving learning environments and
hospitals to train the next generation of doctors. She highlighted trends in the last decade that
have impacted clinical learning environments by transmitting professional values to the next
generation, especially those relevant to medical students and residents’ professional identity
formation. She reviewed some good and not-so-good behaviors that could be impacted during
a medical student’s preclinical years to foster more positive attitudes. Dr. Tibbles posed the
following questions as central to understanding professional identity and professional
development, specifically asking attendees to ask themselves and their colleagues: How am I
instilling curiosity? How am I instilling a love of learning? How am I instilling reliability and excitement for this field early on, and how am I helping medical students take those values into
the clinical learning space? Dr. Tibbles contends that how we think about professionalism in the
clinical space needs to be revised. Instead, she suggests a focus on professional values
integration, not simply managing someone’s behavior but helping them tie their behaviors to
the values that will support them throughout their career.

Dr. Tibbles presented information about her group’s work at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical
Center and with other researchers in professional identity formation. She began by providing
two definitions: First, medical professionalism signifies a set of values, behaviors, and
relationships that underpin the public’s trust in doctors. Second, professionalism in medicine
requires the physician to serve the interests of the patient (and community) above his or
her self‚Äďinterest. Dr. Tibbles pointed out that some enduring characteristics of professionalism,
such as reliability, commitment to lifelong learning, curiosity, altruism, humility, cultural
humility, competence, and compassionate communication skills, are at the core of
professionalism and professional identity. Simultaneously, however, medical education is
evolving and interfacing with emerging tools such as AI. These developments will introduce a
new set of questions on professionalism and what it means to take good care of patients as the
tools, technology, and environment change.

Dr. Tibbles continued her presentation by discussing the concept of wellness in medicine. She
believes that we need to improve the ability of faculty to help students find meaning, purpose,
and joy in their work while incorporating self-care and balance in their lives. The goal is to help
students flourish so they are physically, emotionally, psychologically, and intellectually
prepared to care for others. She stated that this needs to begin early in medical school because
wellness interventions in residency are too late and too little to truly affect the needed
behavior changes. In her view, this is because we aren’t doing enough to truly understand what
makes people well in the workplace and what makes people well in medicine, so it is an area
that we all should be focusing on earlier in a physician’s career path.

Dr. Tibbles shifted her focus to strengthening professionalism and professional identity
formation during the transition from undergraduate to graduate medical education. For faculty
supervising medical students or residents, the question of paramount importance is how
learners view themselves. Are medical students focused on getting good grades, or are they
now concentrating on learning to be the best possible patient caregiver? l Once this transition
occurs, they will be less anxious and more ready to thrive in practice. This transition pertains to
the classroom, where physician skills, attitudes, competencies, and disciplines are discussed.
She further points out that a vital aspect of this transition is discovering that some students are
uncomfortable in the clinical space, especially when they don’t know something. Similarly,
students struggle with the discomfort of training. Unfortunately, some students and residents
confuse some of this discomfort with mistreatment. This is not to say that there isn’t
mistreatment, which certainly warrants attention. Sometimes, however, students need more
time to prepare for the discomfort of clinical training and the unpredictability of providing
direct patient care.

Dr. Tibbles shifted her focus to how the process of caring for patients can put an added burden
on professionalism and professional identity formation. When medical students enter the
clinical environment, they want to behave ethically toward their patients and may feel that the
environment does not support that desire. For example, in a dermatology clinic, a patient needs
an expensive medication, but the provider may not be able to get the patient the medicine they
need. Another example is an environment with healthcare disparities, where different patients
appear to receive different care. These situations are challenging to navigate, especially when
the required actions differ from their personal values. Students experience moral distress when
they feel powerless to change those circumstances. There may also be a culture of silence
around this problem. That leads to moral injury when students ask, “Can I even do this job
anymore?‚ÄĚ Dr. Tibbles pointed out that what we want to achieve through our training programs
in medical school and residency are physicians who have enduring values and resilience to
sustain ethical integrity in response to morally complex or distressing situations. She
recommended increasing opportunities for discussion with students about these professional
challenges and how medical systems and structures can be adjusted to make a difference. She
listed five conditions for effectively confronting these problems: authentic role experiences,
longitudinal relationships, intact teams, interdepartmental learning, and safe spaces for
intentional reflection.

Dr. Tibbles described the expectations of professional training by pointing out that we don’t
need perfection – we need reliability, authenticity, honesty, and respectful behavior. The most
challenging problem is dealing with a student who needs better self-awareness, is not sensitive
to others, requires more insight into their behavior, and is resistant to feedback. Suppose pre-
clinical faculty have a student who’s struggling with feedback. In that case, it is essential to
work on it immediately because it later becomes extremely difficult to address it in the fast
pace of residency. She asked us to think about our department’s professionalism challenges.
First, if you are witnessing unprofessional behavior, how long will it be before it’s detected?
Immediately, relatively soon, it takes a while, or never. Ask yourself if unprofessional behavior
slips under the radar in your department because everybody knows each other. Then, ask
yourself the second question: If there is unprofessional behavior in your department, how long
will it take before it’s effectively addressed? Immediately, relatively soon, it takes a while, or
never. The answers to these questions may well expose a gap between how effective our
processes and procedures are in dealing with a trainee or student with issues. Are we getting to
things early? Are we good at early intervention? Or does a pattern develop before something
happens? Or, in some ways, do we let some things go, assuming they’ll get taken care of down
the road?

Dr. Tibbles concluded her presentation by emphasizing the role of faculty as expert teachers,
mentors, coaches, and interprofessional learning examples for students. She recommended
using the R2C2 Facilitated Feedback Model as an excellent tool for faculty to adopt, specifically
the 4 phases of faculty-student relationships: Phase 1: Rapport and Relationship Building,
Phase 2: Exploring Reactions to Feedback ‚Äď ‚ÄúWhat do you think?‚ÄĚ, Phase 3: Exploring Feedback
Content ‚Äď ‚ÄúDo they get it?‚ÄĚ, and Phase 4: Coaching for Change. This effort is to help medical
students, and residents integrate assisting patients while training for an essential job where patients will rely on them daily. These approaches target the process of increasing professional
responsibility while acquiring the professional identity of our calling and recognizing why our
job is so meaningful.

References:
Rosenbaum, L. (2024). Being Well while Doing Well ‚Äď Distinguishing Necessary from
Unnecessary Discomfort in Training. N Engl J Med 2024; 390:568-572
DOI: 10.1056/NEJMms2308228
https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMms2308228
Mak-van der Vossen M, van Mook W, van der Burgt S, Kors J, Ket JCF, Croiset G, Kusurkar R.
Descriptors for unprofessional behaviours of medical students: a systematic review and
categorisation. BMC Med Educ. 2017 Sep 15;17(1):164. doi: 10.1186/s12909-017-0997-x. PMID:
28915870; PMCID: PMC5603020.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28915870/

IAMSE Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 1 Highlights

Presenter: Mark C. Henderson, MD, MACP, Associate Dean of Admissions, University of California Davis School of Medicine

[The following blog was generated by Susan Ely and Doug McKell]

Creating a Diverse Class of Learners via Socially Accountable Admissions

The Learning Objectives for this first Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar series on Teaching and Learning in Medical and Health Professions Education include the following: First, evaluate the paradigm of social accountability in medical education, including the relationship of representation of increased diversity of health professionals to health equity of underrepresented, underserved, and marginalized patient communities. Second, examine trends in the composition of the US physician workforce, including the percentage of physicians from underrepresented groups compared to their percentage of the population and the changes over time. Third, discuss the UC Davis holistic admissions process, which has increased the diversity of their medical student population despite the 1977 passing of California Prop 209 banning affirmative action.

Dr. Mark Henderson discussed the underrepresentation of marginalized groups in medical schools and the inequities in medical education, emphasizing the need to address these inequities. He stressed the importance of implementing holistic admissions strategies to increase diversity, including long-term changes in the admissions process, cultural support, and peer mentorship. He spoke about the UC Davis School of Medicine and its process over the last 15 years to admit increasingly diverse medical school students. Dr. Henderson began by discussing the paradigm of social accountability as it applies to medical education, specifically medical school admissions, focusing on the current medical student application process that results in the excess or deficit selection of students from some groups compared to their proportional representation in the general population. This negatively affects health equity access and increases health disparities among several underrepresented patient populations. He presented a conceptual model demonstrating why proportional health professional representation and diversity are essential to health equity since individuals and practitioners from disadvantaged groups are more likely to have cultural and language concordance with their patients. This leads to better communication, better trust amongst marginalized communities, and greater health advocacy for such communities, with more health practitioners working in the communities where they are needed.

Dr. Henderson presented data showing that in the United States, the racial/ethnic background, educational advantages, and family income proportions of the demographic composition of physicians who practice in the United States don’t match the United States population as a whole, except for the white population. For example, for the Latino population, which is now almost 20% of the United States, only about 7% of physicians are Hispanic or Latino. There is a similar disparity with the African American population, although it’s not quite as severe, where 6% of physicians are black compared to 13% of the US population. Finally, there is an overrepresentation of Asian subpopulations, where almost 22% of practicing physicians are from Asian subgroups, while Asian Americans comprise only 6% of the US population. Dr. Henderson pointed out that while the US population became much more diverse, with the number of individuals from underrepresented groups living in the US almost doubling from 66 million to over 105 million, and the number of medical schools grew by over 50% between 1997 and 2017, our future physicians do not reflect the US population. Based on the family income of students in medical school today, your chances of being admitted to medical school based on your family’s income are directly proportional to your family income. This means a lower- income student is less than half as likely to be admitted to medical school as a higher-income student.

Dr. Henderson then paraphrased Dr. Martin Luther King’s statement that as capitalism has grown, there are specific segments of the population that have been left out and, in a sense, have exploited impoverished black and white individuals and communities of color. His point was that the inequities he presented dealing with the lack of a representative physician workforce and diversity in the workforce overall were present before last year’s Supreme Court decision that banned affirmative action in the United States. He stated that based on affirmative action bands in California as well as seven other states after those bands were put in place, the racial and ethnic representation in medical schools got much worse. He expects the same thing will occur across the United States unless there’s attention focused on this issue.

Dr. Henderson then described how to make the necessary changes to create a more diverse and representative medical student population. The most crucial step is to have a sense of urgency. The UC Davis School of Medicine was directly affected by the state-wide affirmative action ban enacted in 1997. In 2005, they began a series of process changes, and the enrollment of underrepresented groups has tripled over about 15 years. Many structural elements are present, as alluded to earlier, e.g., privilege, class, and racism. These elements tend to preserve the status quo. Inertia is another factor, as is the fear of lawsuits, even before the recent SCOTUS decision. What is most important is an institution‚Äôs mission. Dr. Henderson stated that it is essential to ask your medical school the following question: What medical education goals is the institution trying to accomplish? He argued that the mission of medical education is to train physicians to meet the health needs of society. Fundamentally, it is a social mission. The first step at UC Davis School of Medicine was to adopt a mission focused on meeting society’s needs: socially accountable admissions. This meant that the mission of the UC Davis School of Medicine was to matriculate future physicians who will address California’s diverse health workforce needs.

The UC Davis School of Medicine admissions office shifted its operation to include input from a diverse group of faculty, students, trainees, and patients. They use multiple mini- interviews blinded to several biasing elements that favor the admission of individuals from privileged backgrounds or those who have had more excellent educational opportunities. Using a holistic review is an important paradigm involving choosing students who fit within a school’s mission. It’s about more than just their grades or test scores, which don’t tend to correlate necessarily to the mission. Dr. Henderson emphasized the importance of previous healthcare experiences, whether personal experiences or work experiences within the healthcare system. 45% percent of UC Davis School of Medicine students are the first in their families to graduate from college, which results from applying more inclusive selection criteria to create a more comprehensive economic representation of enrolled students. Finally, Dr. Henderson explained that UC Davis School of Medicine has developed several partnerships with local high schools, local community colleges, and other medical schools that share a similar mission.

Another critical way the UC Davis School of Medicine has approached its mission is to develop inclusive programs focused on community health needs. The Community Health Scholars program comprises almost a third of enrolled students. Most of these students are first-generation-to-attend-college individuals from low-income backgrounds and are often from underrepresented groups. Admissions criteria for these programs prioritize individuals from these communities. The first one, established in 2007, is called Rural PRIME. It is meant to address the maldistribution of physicians in California. Another program, TEACH-MS, focuses on the underserved urban population. The Central Valley REACH program is concentrated in the Central Valley, the agricultural hub of California. The Accelerated Competency-based Education Primary Care program is a 3-year MD degree pathway for Primary Care physicians and is the beneficiary of several external funding sources. Lastly, a program focused on California Native American/American Indian communities was established in 2022.

Dr. Henderson then described the long-term outcome of the residency program match for UC Davis School of Medicine students. Based on data from 147 students over the last ten years, about 80% come from groups underrepresented in medicine. Most students are matched into specialties of need in California, with 43% going into traditional primary care. If ob-gyn, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and internal medicine are included, about 75% of the students would go into some form of primary care.

Dr. Henderson stressed that this level of success requires looking at your applicant pool differently. UC Davis School of Medicine developed a tool called the data scale, which is a metric derived from each student‚Äôs application. It incorporates several socio-economic variables to form a score from zero to 99. A high score on this scale means the student has experienced significant socio-economic distress. A low score would mean they’ve experienced very little hardship. The variables include income, parental education, working during college, or growing up in an underserved area. Because traditional measures of excellence or merit tend to be confounded by educational opportunity, we use this scale to provide context to those other measures. Because it’s a number, it tends to nudge our committee members to be more holistic and dive deeper into every applicant‚Äôs application. Dr. Henderson indicated that he believes this correlates to resilience or grit and the ability to overcome obstacles, i.e., essential qualities in future physicians.

Dr. Henderson focused on three programs that help ensure medical student success. The first program is their Community Health Scholar program called ACE PC, which admits eight students a year, all of whom have primary care experience before medical school admission, either as an emergency medical technician, a medical assistant, an ancillary health provider, or someone who worked in a healthcare center. 85% of these students are first-generation college graduates. They are admitted to medical school with lower grades and lower MCAT scores, but they finish in three years instead of four, and almost 90% of them match into a primary care residency. They get a full tuition scholarship because accumulated medical school debt discourages many students from pursuing primary care.

The second program is a community college-to-medical school Pathway Program. It turns out that about half of the Latino family residents came through the community college system, and a third of the black family residents went to community college. This is a significant pathway for underrepresented students. The problem is that many community college students don’t finish, or they don’t transfer, or it takes them quite a bit of time to transfer. About 2.5% transfer within two years of community college, and only a quarter within four years. This program aims to build bridges between community colleges and the UC Davis undergraduate campus. Once the students are at the undergraduate campus, they provide additional health professions career advice and help them address gaps in their educational preparation.

The last program is a partnership with Oregon Health Sciences for a tribal health medical school pathway program called Wy’est. This residential post-baccalaureate program accepts Native American students who have applied to medical school but have been unsuccessful. They spend ten months in Portland. If they meet the requirements of the post-baccalaureate program over this period and the Wy’est program requirements, they receive conditional acceptance into UC Davis School of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University School of Medicine, or the Washington State School of Medicine. This program has been quite successful over the last eight years. The students from this track enter the Tribal Health Community Health scholar program when accepted at UC Davis School of Medicine.

Dr. Henderson concluded his presentation by repeating his main point that the mission of medical education is to train physicians to meet society’s health needs. He reported that supporting students with additional academic advising resources and financial aid has additional costs. At the same time, he was optimistic that other advances in medical education, such as AI, may make the holistic admission process more equitable despite concerns about fairness and potential misuse.

Submit Your Application for the IAMSE 2024 IM-REACH Program!

The International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) is pleased to announce that applications for the IAMSE Mentoring (IM-REACH) Certificate Program are now invited! 

Mentoring students, postdocs, and faculty and guiding their work is crucial for their success in diverse career paths that encompass leadership, clinical and educational roles. The IAMSE Mentoring Certificate program is a productive way to prepare for a role as mentors and support mentees in their career paths and academic pursuits. Mentorship is a skill for both the mentor and mentee, a true dynamic relationship that is a journey in pursuit of career engagement and success.

The IM-REACH certificate program provides an opportunity to enhance skills, gain experience, and engage in reflection and growth as a mentor and ultimately influence your relationship with your mentee. The goal of this program is to develop well-rounded, diverse health professional education mentors through targeted professional development in key aspects of mentorship, which includes both knowledge and skills. The program will provide evidence of that mentorship leads to specialized achievement that enhances and supports career advancement for both mentors and mentees. 

  • Participants will complete a one-year certificate program with a scholarly project related to their professional needs as a mentor or as an educational leader supporting mentorship programs with mentors and mentees.
  • Participants will complete a validated mentoring assessment pre- and post-program in order to demonstrate growth, comfort, and knowledge gained.
  • Participants will keep a reflective journal detailing the experiences of a current mentor/mentee relationship in order to guide their learning and growth as a mentor/mentee. This will be debriefed with a program leader in individual sessions.
  • The year-long certificate focuses on the dual role of mentors and mentees in establishing a mentor/mentee relationship;  this journey will explore how the mentees roles evolve based on the developmental stage and goals of the mentee in one or more areas of their career.

The program will include every other month group workshops based on content from the IAMSE mentoring manual (virtual). The alternating months will be a one-on-one meet-up with a program leader/facilitator to address individual needs as a mentor and mentorship on the program project. It will conclude one year later with a three-hour workshop at IAMSE (virtual or face-to-face) to wrap up the program. Here, fellows will present their final project to the group with the goal of eventually presenting as a poster at the IAMSE Conference the following year. 

Applicants for this cohort will be accepted until April 1, 2024. All accepted applicants will be informed by April 15, 2024. Payment must be submitted to IAMSE by May 1, 2024. You may submit your application by clicking here. For questions about the IM-REACH Program or how to apply, please contact support@iamse.org. We thank you for your interest and look forward to supporting you in achieving your professional goals in educational scholarship.

IAMSE Winter 2024 Webcast Audio Series – Week 5 Highlights

Presenter: Thirusha Naidu, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Associate Professor Department Behavioral
Health, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

[The following notes were generated by Michele Haight]

Refracting Lenses Seeing Women of Color in Global Health

This presentation includes my reflection on the entire “One World, One Health: Tackling the Global
Health Crisis‚ÄĚ
IAMSE webinar series. It also includes artwork created by Faith Ringold and other artists,
whose work depicts the content of the presentation and provides a visual representation of ideas.

My historical identity in South Africa is connected to my ancestors who were slaves/indentured servants
from India, forced to leave their home due to the ongoing extraction of goods and resources from the
Asian continent by the British colonizers. I grew up in South Africa during apartheid and attended
segregated schools. I have been a recipient of the global health experience, and I position my research
through the lens of a recipient rather than a provider. All these aspects of my identity inform my
positionality and have influenced the way I think about and conduct my research.

The following are my reflections on the prior webinars presented during this series.

Baenziger: Global Health Electives: Impact, Challenges and Best Practices This perspective speaks from
the Global North (GN) to the Global South (GS), intervening, talking, and acting toward the GS. It is
critical to understand how GS researchers experience this. The flow of global health training is not
bidirectional in an equitable way. Most GN trainees go to the GS for training, not vice versa. Training and
intervention occur in the GN. Knowledge flow goes from the GN to the GS, whereas extraction goes from
the GS to the GN. Work needs to be done to level extraction and exchange, learning and ideas. Critical
questions:
Are we teaching white saviorism or respecting local knowledge and agency? What is the
global health archetype student we are creating?

Richardson: Impact of Climate Change on Global Health. Climate change is not experienced equally.
Africa and African women disproportionately experience the negative effects of climate change.
Because African women are tied to the land, climate change impacts their lives more severely. These
impacts include agricultural production, food nutrition, food security, and health impact on water,
energy, disaster migration and conflict. Climate change must address the needs of women in the poorest
parts of the world in order to be relevant. People in political and economic power are making decisions
as to how climate change needs to be addressed and dealt with. Critical question: Whose perspective
and interests are we focusing on in climate change conversations?

Rashid: Global Approaches to Medical Education: Who Wins? This presentation deals with accreditation
and how the WFME sets global standards for medical/health professions education. Clinical standards
are set by Euro-North American methods, and do not really reflect the context of the training in other
countries. The WFME is skewed towards Western interests, perspectives, and ideas of how people
should be trained. The WFME system promotes the credibility of Western ideas and content while
keeping silent about, even ignoring the fact that there are other methods of teaching health professions
education in the world. Methods for teaching health professionals are relevant to the context in which they are taught. However, the educational methods of the GS are not given credibility because the
powers lie with the GN.

There has been a feminization of the health professions in the GN but not in the GS where fewer health
officials are women. Women get a worse deal in health systems because these systems are structured
according to a male dominated health system. We need more women in the health professions to
provide experience and perspective to properly address the needs of women. We need to develop plans
to train more women. Critical questions: Are we teaching a masculine curriculum that epitomizes male
thinking? Who is determining the basic criteria for standards and what ways of thinking do they base
their determinants on?

Cianciolo, De Jong, & Ramani: Culture and Practices for Global Inclusion in Health Professions Education
(HPE) Publishing: What Can Work? The leaky pipeline in medical education (Kusurkar, 2022), shows how
knowledge production in publishing occurs in medical education where low- and middle-income
countries (LMIC) are not part of the knowledge conversation. This creates a lack of diversity among
reviewers who do not see what is important for researchers in these countries. The knowledge system is
designed to rely on methods that are structured by Western epistemology. Editorial boards lack diversity
as well and further marginalize differing perspectives and epistemologies. There needs to be deepened
partnerships between the GN and GS, widened access to publications, and diverse types of papers that
are published. Critical questions: In medical education publishing, whose voices are we hearing most?
Who is controlling access to knowledge production?

GS authors identified three different categories of difficulty in getting their papers published: practical,
academic, and transformational.

Modern medicine is an artifact of colonialism because the science it underpins emerged from Western
knowledge structures that are based on a history of colonialism. The colonial roots of medicine include
colonization, colonialism, and coloniality. Coloniality has outlived colonialism and is preserved in our
books and our criteria for academic performance.

Quijano (2000) has proposed a colonial matrix of power that consists of a triad of colonialism, racism,
and patriarchy. He stated that this matrix permeated the colonial world and has cascaded down into the
modern world; it continues to dominate our knowledge and subjectivity.

Maldonado-Torres (2007) noted that coloniality is not over, it is all over, everywhere; it is ubiquitous.

In Zero Point Hubris, Castro-Gomez, (2021) points out that our behaviors and decisions continue to be
influenced by coloniality through our internalized colonizer. The information problem in global health is
that we are all victims of this mindset.

If we focus on women of color in the world who experience the most difficulties and challenges, we will
get it right for everyone else. By attending to women of color we can enhance global health and health
for all.

Registration is Now OPEN for the Spring 2024 Webcast Audio Seminar Series

Medical education presents ever-changing opportunities and challenges for learning communities and institutions. In the past five years alone, learners and educators have confronted a global pandemic that temporarily ended in-class content delivery, the advent of Pass/Fail score reporting on USMLE Step 1/COMLEX Level 1with dramatic effects on residency placement for both US and foreign medical graduates, and the expanding use of Artificial Intelligence in clinical practice and medical education. The Spring 2024 IAMSE Webinar Series will address strategies to expand and enhance a dynamic culture of teaching and learning for our educators and learners. This five-part series will begin with a consideration of how best to serve an increasingly diverse group of learners and promote the expansion of diversity at all levels. The webinar series will explore the importance of maintaining and enhancing a culture of professionalism, then generational differences within learning communities will be addressed, reflecting the three or more generations represented by learners and faculty at most medical schools. Another session will examine approaches to promoting wellness and mitigating burnout among all learning community members in the context of educating future clinicians on the importance of work-life balance. The series will conclude with a consideration of the ‚Äúhidden curriculum‚ÄĚ, perceived by many learners as a parallel curriculum. The goal of the series is to encourage and enable participants to embrace change and foster innovative approaches to teaching and learning as we conclude the initial quartile of the twenty-first century.

Empowering Minds: Fostering a Dynamic Culture of
Teaching and Learning

Join us for each one-hour session beginning Thursday, March 7 at 12 PM EST. Sessions in the Spring 2024 series include:

  • March 7, 12 PM EST – Creating A Diverse Class of Learners presented by Mark Henderson
  • March 14, 12 PM EDT – Moving beyond Professionalism to Professional Values Integration in Medical Education
    presented by Carrie Tibbles
    Please note that Daylight Savings begins in the United States on March 10. Please be sure to check the presentation times with your local time zone.
  • March 21, 12 PM EDT – Exploring Best Practices in Health Professions Education for Gen Z Students presented by Shannon Jiminez, Sarah Lerchenfeldt, and Kara Sawarynski
  • March 28, 12 PM EDT – Student Motivation and Well-Being in Medical School and the Resilient Mindsets in Medicine Initiative presented by Kenn Barron, Zachary Himmelberger, and Yoi Tibbetts
  • April 4, 12 PM EDT – Navigating the Hidden Curriculum in Health Professions Education presented by Megan Brown

As always, IAMSE Student Members can register for the series for FREE! Email support@iamse.org for more details.