2010 Fall: Team Based Learning - Fundamentals, Implementation and Research


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September 23, 2010 at 12:00 pm

TBL 101 – Where to begin

Presenter: Larry Michaelsen, Ph.D.

Larry MichaelsenLarry K. Michaelsen, Ph.D.
Professor of Management
University of Central Missouri
lmichaelsen@ucmo.edu

Larry K. Michaelsen (Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from The University of Michigan) David Ross Boyd Professor Emeritus at the University of Oklahoma, Professor of Management at Central Missouri State University, a Carnegie Scholar, a Fulbright Senior Scholar and, former Editor of the Journal of Management Education. He is active in faculty and staff development activities and has conducted workshops on teaching effectively with small groups in a wide variety of university and, corporate settings. Dr. Michaelsen has also received numerous college, university and national awards for his outstanding teaching and for his pioneering work in two areas. One is the development of Team-Based Learning, a comprehensive small-group based instructional process that is now being used in over 100 academic disciplines and on over 200 campuses in the US and in eight foreign countries.

This is the single best introduction to TBL.   The structure, process, and essential characteristics of an effective TBL module are emphasized.

By the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to:

1) Explain the key components of a successful TBL module.
2) Outline how they would construct a TBL module from a set of objectives.
3) Describe how they might convert a course/lecture they already teach into a TBL module.
4) Illustrate how to transform a small group into a productive learning-team.

Movie Clips referenced in the presentation:
Video #1   /   Video #2

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September 30, 2010 at 12:00 pm

Voices of Experience Adopting TBL Into your Course

Presenter: Ed McKee, Ph.D., and Brenda Roman, M.D.

Ed McKeeEd McKee is an Associate Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine  РSouth Bend . He directs and teaches the Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology to 1st year students and directs and teaches Medical Genetics to 2nd year students. He has made extensive use of TBLs in both courses for the past 5 years. He is active in the Team-Based Learning community and has given papers and workshops on Team-Based learning at National and International meetings and has served as a consultant for Medical Schools wishing to incorporate TBL into their biochemistry and genetics curriculum.


Brenda RomanBrenda Roman is Professor and Director of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry at the Boonshoft School of Medicine Wright State University.  She has nearly 20 years of experience in medical education, and directs the first year Human Development Course, the second year Psychopathology Course and the Psychiatry Clerkship.  She has been utilizing TBL in the pre-clinical courses for 7 years and the Psychiatry Clerkship for 5 years.  She has given national presentations on Team Based Learning at various meetings.

Join us as we discuss our experiences in adopting TBL to a basic science course (Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) and in clinical clerkships. We will describe how we train new students in the TBL format and how we use TBL to train and evaluate students in developing the skills that will make them a good team member (communication, self-awareness, problem solving, professionalism). We will describe our processes of developing TBL exercises and the response of our students to these exercises.

Seminar Archive
October 7, 2010 at 12:00 am

Peer Evaluation

Presenter: Ruth Levine, M.D., and Paul Koles, M.D.

Ruth LevineRuth Levine, MD
Professor of Psychiatry
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Texas
rlevine@utmb.edu

I have been using TBL in the Psychiatry clerkship since 2002, and in the Neuroscience and Human Behavior course since 2003. I have conducted numerous workshops and assisted faculty in a variety of disciplines to learn about and establish Team-Based Learning programs in medical student, resident, and nursing education. TBL consulting to local, national and international audiences.


Paul KolesPaul G. Koles, M.D.
Associate Professor of Pathology
Director, Pathology Education

Education M.D.:

Loma Linda University (1979)
Internship: Kettering Medical Center
Residency: Kettering Medical Center (1985)

Peer evaluation is an essential component of Team Based Learning, yet many health science educators have encountered difficulties when attempting to incorporate a peer evaluation program into their TBL courses. Peer evaluation is often perceived as an uncomfortable or threatening process.  In this webinar, we will introduce to you the reasons for peer evaluation,   strategies of peer evaluation that have been used in Team Based Learning, and the advantages and disadvantages of the major strategies. We will illustrate the peer evaluation methods that we both use and the reasons that we have incorporated these methods into our respective curricula.

Seminar Archive
October 14, 2010 at 12:00 pm

Creating Good TBL Questions and Using MedED Portal Resources

Presenter: Jim Sibley, and Ed McKee, Ph.D.

Jim SibleyJim Sibley
Director – Centre for Instructional Support,
Faculty of Applied Science
University of British Columbia, Canada
jim.sibley@ubc.ca

Director of the Centre for Instructional Support in the Faculty of Applied Science at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. He has been using TBL for seven years and has assisted faculty in the implementation of TBL in over 25 courses. He has consulted internationally  (Pakistan, Korea, Australia, and United States), presented at many international conferences (including IAMSE), and is active in the Team-Based Learning Collaborative.


Ed McKeeEd McKee is an Associate Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine  РSouth Bend . He directs and teaches the Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology to 1st year students and directs and teaches Medical Genetics to 2nd year students. He has made extensive use of TBLs in both courses for the past 5 years. He is active in the Team-Based Learning community and has given papers and workshops on Team-Based learning at National and International meetings and has served as a consultant for Medical Schools wishing to incorporate TBL into their biochemistry and genetics curriculum.

Come join us for this seminar that will introduce you to the design and development of effective TBL exercises. ¬†We will highlight the use backwards design to connect your course objectives with effective TBL questions. Specifically, we will highlight strategies to develop questions using the 4 S’s TBL question framework.

We will also discuss the differences between Readiness Assurance Test  (RAT) questions and Application questions. We will discuss how to get started designing TBL questions and activities, perhaps with resources with which you are already familiar. We will provide an overview of the design of a specific MedEd Portal published TBL and other TBLs that are in the MedEd Portal collection.  Finally we will suggest where to get help with TBL implementation questions.

Seminar Archive
October 21, 2010 at 12:00 pm

The 12 Tips of Creating a Good TBL Course

Presenter: Dean Parmelee, M.D., and Larry Michaelsen, Ph.D.

Dean ParmeleeDean X. Parmelee, MD
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Professor of Psychiatry, Professor of Pediatrics
Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
dean.parmelee@wright.edu

At the Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dr. Parmelee has championed the development of Team-Based Learning for medical and health sciences education. In addition to publications on this topic, he has conducted over 40 workshops/presentations on medical education topics for faculty development at annual meetings of the American Association of Medical Colleges and the following medical schools:

Dartmouth Medical School
Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine & Dentistry
Case-Western Reserve
Catholic University of Korea
University of Cincinnati
Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine
Wright State University
Indiana University School of Medicine
Virginia Commonwealth University
University of Arkansas
Florida State University
University of California at Davis
Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Duke/National University of Singapore
National University of Singapore
Pennsylvania State University
Catholic University of Korea
Tulane
Jordan University of Science and Technology
Johns Hopkins
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
University of Michigan
New Jersey Medical School
University of West Virginia


Larry MichaelsenLarry K. Michaelsen, Ph.D.
Professor of Management
University of Central Missouri
lmichaelsen@ucmo.edu

Larry K. Michaelsen (Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from The University of Michigan) David Ross Boyd Professor Emeritus at the University of Oklahoma, Professor of Management at Central Missouri State University, a Carnegie Scholar, a Fulbright Senior Scholar and, former Editor of the Journal of Management Education. He is active in faculty and staff development activities and has conducted workshops on teaching effectively with small groups in a wide variety of university and, corporate settings. Dr. Michaelsen has also received numerous college, university and national awards for his outstanding teaching and for his pioneering work in two areas. One is the development of Team-Based Learning, a comprehensive small-group based instructional process that is now being used in over 100 academic disciplines and on over 200 campuses in the US and in eight foreign countries.

Team-based learning (TBL) in medical education has emerged over the past few years as an instructional strategy to enhance active learning and critical thinking Рeven in large, basic science courses.  Although TBL consistently improves academic outcomes by shifting the instructional focus from knowledge transmission to knowledge application, it also addresses several professional competencies that cannot be achieved or evaluated through lecture-based instruction.  The 12 tips to be presented in this seminar will provide the attendee with a set of specific recommendations which, if followed, will ensure the successful design and implementation of TBL for a unit of study.

Seminar Archive
October 28, 2010 at 12:00 pm

Research in Team-Based Learning

Presenter: Paul Haidet, M.D., M.P.H.

Paul HaidetPaul Haidet, M.D., M.P.H.
General Internist
Department of Medicine
Baylor College of Medicine
phaidet@bcm.edu

Dr. Haidet is a general internist in the Department of Medicine. He is a member of the class of 1999-2000 of the Master Teacher Fellowship. An active member of the American Academy on Physician and Patient. Dr. Haidet has advanced training in small group teaching and communication skills. He has facilitated small group learning sessions (including Problem-Based Learning and Bedside Teaching) at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Baylor College of Medicine. Dr Haidet is available for direct observation and input on clinical teaching, team learning, including both one-to-one (as in the outpatient setting) and small group formats (as in bedside rounds).

The health sciences present unique challenges for educators in terms of the structure, timing, and context of educational efforts. This creates a particularly vibrant and complex environment, and also creates opportunities for research. Amid this environment, the growing popularity of Team-Based Learning leads to a need for ongoing scholarship about the effects of the method, its implementation, and its dissemination. In today’s web seminar, Paul Haidet, one of the original proponents of TBL in medical education, provides a sampling of some of the representative work to date, and discusses issues in performing research in the setting of TBL classrooms. He will also sample some of the research tools that have been used to evaluate TBL, and present a conceptual model to drive future scholarly efforts. A bibliography of current peer-reviewed articles will be provided.

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